Historicalphotos

Wednesday, 22 December 2010

Iconic Abbey Road Zebra Crossing is listed

Tourism and Heritage Minister John Penrose has announced that London's iconic Abbey Road zebra crossing is now Grade II listed.

The pedestrian crossing - located in St John's Wood, London - was immortalised in the 1960s by The Beatles and has been listed following advice from English Heritage.
It is the first site of its kind to receive such designation and reflects the crossing's cultural and historical importance.

The nearby Abbey Road studios were listed in February.

Tim Davies

www.copperphoenix.co.uk 

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Christmas


Christmas
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

Merry Christmas to you all! A big thank you to our customers and we look forward to offering a wider range of services in 2011. We'll let you know when the new website goes live.

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

Wednesday, 15 December 2010

Harrier Jump Jets Take Off For Final Show

Britain's Harrier jump jets have taken off today on what is billed as their "final flight" before Government spending cuts fall on them and they are withdrawn.

The 16-strong fleet of famous and distinctive aircraft headed off into the sky above RAF Cottesmore in the East Midlands on a farewell journey due to take them over several other RAF bases. Weather permitting, they are scheduled to fly over the local town centres of Stamford and Oakham as well as Lincoln Cathedral before landing back at RAF Cottesmore later.

The jets date back to the 1960s when the first generation of Harriers were built in the UK and in 1969 the Royal Air Force became the first in the world to use the jets' unusual vertical take-off and landing abilities. This distinctive feature previously only possible with helicopters and other rotary wing aircraft, enabled the Harriers to fly in and out of areas near to the battlefield that conventional aircraft couldn't reach. It meant they did not need airstrips and could hide more effectively.

They became famous for their ability to hover above the ground and proved themselves against faster supersonic jets during the Falklands Conflict in 1982, the Harrier being a sub-sonic aircraft. They developed their own fighting tactics, using their directional jet nozzles to stop in mid air, let enemy aircraft pass then attack.

But the Harriers fell victim to the recent bout of cuts, coupled with the loss of the aircraft carriers from which the Harriers operated from, when the Government announced the Harriers would be removed from service in this autumn's defence review.

The farewell flight is in celebration of their retirement, the Ministry of Defence said.
 
They will be missed!

--

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Monday, 13 December 2010

Another Satisfied Copper Phoenix Customer!

Dear Tim

It is only in recent years that law forms have been allowed to promote themselves which means that marketing is something that is relatively new to the legal profession.

Your marketing health check was a real eye-opener and showed us how important a proper marketing strategy is to our business.  The written report you produced following our meeting gave us an honest and objective view of our current marketing methods and suggested areas that could be improved.  Not only did we immediately see ways in which we could increase our visibility in the market place, you showed us how we can actually monitor any future marketing strategies to make sure that our efforts achieve the desired results.

For ongoing marketing services the prices you have quoted are unbelievably competitive and I have no hesitation in recommending your services to any business owner who needs to implement or rethink their marketing strategy.

Yours sincerely




Heather Childs
ALAN HODGE SOLICITORS
 
 
 

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Monday, 29 November 2010

A Satisfied Customer!

Dear Tim,
 
I wanted to say how much I have appreciated your assistance and professionalism in drastically increasing my understanding of social media and technological marketing.

I am, I thought, a complete geek and I thought I was able to teach myself most of the stuff necessary to increase my online presence. However, where I have been unable to gain a complete understanding, your advice and help had led to my realization that in fact I am a terrible self-teacher and I should leave it to the professionals. Following our most recent newsletter training session, hits to my site doubled within 8 hours and on my Flickr gallery, where my daily average is between 30 and 50 hits, I topped out at 394 yesterday at 9:15pm.

I had seen smaller spikes before but nothing on this scale and I have no doubt it is a direct result of your help and training - and this of course is closely watched daily and we’ll have to organise another session to track the next stage.

I would not only recommend but urge anyone I know to you for your remarkably in depth and varied knowledge of how to increase visibility, online or otherwise.

Yours sincerely
Rupert Marlow

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Monday, 15 November 2010

If World War One Was a Pub Fight

This is a light hearted but surprisingly true take on the causes and outcome of WW1. My Thanks to Steve Bolt for passing it to me!
 
 
Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of a pub when Serbia bumps into Austria and spills Austria’s pint.

Austria demands Serbia buy it a complete new suit because there are splashes on its trouser leg.

Germany expresses its support for Austria’s point of view.

Britain recommends that everyone calm down a bit.

Serbia points out that it can’t afford a whole suit, but offers to pay for the cleaning of Austria’s trousers.

Russia and Serbia look at Austria.

Austria asks Serbia who it’s looking at.

Russia suggests that Austria should leave its little brother alone.

Austria inquires as to whose army will assist Russia in compelling it to do so.

Germany appeals to Britain that France has been looking at it, and that this is sufficiently out of order that Britain should not intervene.

Britain replies that France can look at who it wants to, that Britain is looking at Germany too, and what is Germany going to do about it?

Germany tells Russia to stop looking at Austria, or Germany will render Russia incapable of such action.

Britain and France ask Germany whether it’s looking at Belgium.

Turkey and Germany go off into a corner and whisper. When they come back, Turkey makes a show of not looking at anyone.

Germany rolls up its sleeves, looks at France, and punches Belgium.

France and Britain punch Germany. Austria punches Russia. Germany punches Britain and France with one hand and Russia with the other.

Russia throws a punch at Germany, but misses and nearly falls over. Japan calls over from the other side of the room that it’s on Britain’s side, but stays there. Italy surprises everyone by punching Austria.

Australia punches Turkey, and gets punched back. There are no hard feelings because Britain made Australia do it.

France gets thrown through a plate glass window, but gets back up and carries on fighting. Russia gets thrown through another one, gets knocked out, suffers brain damage, and wakes up with a complete personality change.

Italy throws a punch at Austria and misses, but Austria falls over anyway. Italy raises both fists in the air and runs round the room chanting.

America waits till Germany is about to fall over from sustained punching from Britain and France, then walks over and smashes it with a bar stool, then pretends it won the fight all by itself.

By now all the chairs are broken and the big mirror over the bar is shattered. Britain, France and America agree that Germany threw the first punch, so the whole thing is Germany’s fault . While Germany is still unconscious, they go through its pockets, steal its wallet, and buy drinks for all their friends.

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Friday, 22 October 2010

Last flying Vulcan runs out of time on Thursday 28th 2010

Thursday’s Trust meeting could ground or sell one of Britain’s most loved aircraft

The last flying Vulcan, which thrilled almost two million people this year, could be grounded or sold abroad due to lack of money. At a meeting on the evening of October 28th, the Vulcan To The Sky Trust which owns the aircraft, will decide if it has raised enough funds to continue.

“By Thursday evening, we need to be sure that we will have £300,000 by the end of the week. If there is any doubt, she will follow Concorde into permanent retirement or be sold to a collector almost certainly abroad,” warns trust CEO Dr Robert Pleming.

“If we don’t make it, a heritage icon as popular as The Tower of London may never be seen by the British public again.”

Pleming says that the Vulcan is one of the UK’s most popular heritage attractions and an increasingly engaging part of technology and history education. Yet it receives no Government funding. “We have a great business plan for 2011 that will substantially improve our commercial funding,” says Pleming. “But the stark reality is that we look unlikely to survive beyond October.”

To make a donation to save the Vulcan see http://www.vulcantothesky.org/donate.html
 

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Thursday, 21 October 2010

Comprehensive Spending Review and Heritage/Tourism

Leisure sector organisations have issued a mixed response to the chancellor's Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR) published yesterday (20 October).
George Osborne announced a 25 per cent cut in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) budget, which will run over the course of the review period to 2014-15.

Culture secretary Jeremy Hunt insisted it was a 'good settlement' and will help enable the government to "protect our sporting and cultural core for the long term". Hunt indicated that a 41 per cent cut in administrative costs is to help prioritise front-line public services, while reiterating plans to provide an additional £150m of Lottery funding after 2012.

However, DCMS budget cuts are set to have a knock-on effect as organisations funded by the department face up to overall cuts of at least 28 per cent to their respective budgets.

Arts: Arts Council England (ACE) has warned that a 29.6 per cent cut to its budget will "inevitably" have consequences for the UK's cultural industry.
ACE chief executive Alan Davey said: "[We] will seek to minimise the effect of any cuts to the portfolio of arts organisations we regularly fund and will consider the overall position when it meets on 25 October.

Museums and Heritage: English Heritage has said that it is "disappointed" that it will face a 32 per cent reduction in grant funding from the government - more than the DCMS' overall cut of 25 per cent.

Baroness Andrews, chair of English Heritage, said: "The 32 per cent cut to English Heritage's grant from government will be exceptionally challenging to manage after years of funding decline - £130m real-term cuts over 13 years. "It will require us to make some tough decisions. We will work with the Heritage Lottery Fund to ensure there is no overlap or duplication in the services we provide."

Elsewhere, the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) has welcomed the news that the government will contribute £20m in grant-in-aid funding over the course of the review period. NHMF chair Dame Jenny Abramsky said: "We are pleased that in difficult circumstances the important role of the National Heritage Memorial Fund - the emergency fund to save our most important and precious heritage - has been recognised.

"Of course, it is disappointing that this is less than the grant in aid since 2007 of £10m per year, but, in these difficult times, we will continue to do our utmost to play a vital part in saving great heritage right across the UK."
Museums Association (MA) president Vanessa Trevelyan said the 15 per cent cuts to Renaissance and national museums were not as bad as first feared. Trevelyan admitted that regional museums could be worst affected by local authority spending cuts, while plans to reduce administration costs "shows a lack of understanding".
 
However, the move to retain free entry at museums and galleries has not been universally welcomed, with the British Association of Leisure Parks, Piers and Attractions (BALPPA) criticising the decision.

BALPPA chief executive Martin Barratt said: "I was not surprised to learn that the government will continue to fund free entry to museums, it's in the coalition document and is therefore considered sacrosanct even though it's barmy. We're heading into a period when the effort to market England will rely less on government agencies and more on the initiative of groups of attraction operators."

Tourism: National tourism agency VisitBritain faces one of the largest overall budget cuts within the DCMS' remit, with a 34 per cent reduction confirmed following the CSR. VisitBritain chair Christopher Rodrigues said the agency would examine its operations in order to keep it's Olympic strategy on course and look to slash overheads. Rodrigues said: "This government understands the value VisitBritain brings to Britain's tourism industry, but this is tough love. VisitBritain will respond to the settlement by further cutting overheads and reducing its physical network overseas to retain as much money as possible for our global marketing effort."

However, Tourism Alliance chair Ken Robinson said the cuts went against Prime Minister David Cameron's recent pledge to promote the UK's tourism industry. Robinson said: "With DCMS saying that all sectors must share the pain, we expected cuts. We know that VisitBritain and VisitEngland will respond, using every pound wisely.
"However, the Treasury's attitude to tourism, not recognising that investment in the sector brings immediate and high returns to Britain, is short sighted."
Training: One of Osborne's signature pledges within the CSR is the news that at least 75,000 apprenticeship places are to be created each year by 2014.

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Monday, 16 August 2010

Oystermouth Castle to receive £1m Refurbishment

Oystermouth Castle in Swansea is to receive a £1m refurbishment as part of plans to establish it as a premium heritage attraction.
The project will be funded by the Welsh Assembly's Heritage Tourism grant which has earmarked a total of £19m towards similar projects across Wales.
Work on Oystermouth Castle will include improving access to the Norman stone castle and to assure the long-term sustainability of the site.
To encourage more people to visit the castle there are also plans to launch an events programme.

A castle community co-ordinator will be appointed to manage a range of events, engage with community groups. The Alina's Chapel on the site will also be developed into a multi-functional space. The castle currently receives 5,000 visitors a year and the target is to increase this to 25,000 a year by 2014.
Minister for Heritage, Alun Ffred Jones said: "Tourism is an important part of our economy and this project will make a positive contribution to attracting visitors to Swansea.

"The project also aims to ensure the castle is accessible and relevant to the people of Swansea."

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Friday, 6 August 2010

Tourism beats growth predictions

The total value of tourism to the UK is set to rise by more than 60 per cent to £188 billion over the next decade, says an independent report commissioned by VisitBritain. Research from Deloitte and Oxford Economics forecasts that the favourable exchange rate, the lure of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the appeal of world-renowned attractions, should ensure the sector grows at an above-average 3.5 per cent per annum between now and 2020. The number of jobs supported by tourism over that period is predicted to rise by 264,000 - from 2.63 million now, to 2.89 million. The report also shows that tourism is disproportionately important in rural areas and for part-time female workers.

 

This forecast adds to the HLF figures published in March 2010 that demonstrated the significance of heritage-led tourism in the UK tourism industry; some £20.6 billion per annum, supporting 466,000 jobs. This latest research means the total economic contribution of the Visitor Economy – covering firms directly and indirectly involved in tourism - is poised to expand faster than retail, chemicals, transport, the utilities and manufacturing. Only construction and financial and business services look more promising.
 
These figures make tourism Britain’s fifth biggest industry and third largest foreign exchange earner.

 

Taken from Heritage Link

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Tuesday, 27 July 2010

MLA says ‘stormy seas call for cool heads and steady hands’

Responding to the government’s announcement that the MLA is to be wound up by April 2012, Chair Sir Andrew Motion and Chief Executive Roy Clare pledge a smooth and orderly transition to deliver the best possible future for museums, libraries and archives across England and for the people and communities who expect to use them.
 
In a joint statement, Sir Andrew Motion and Roy Clare say: “Stormy seas call for cool heads and steady hands. The team in the MLA have worked tirelessly and with commendable commitment to develop the capacity of the organisation since 2007. Now, faced with an unforeseen degree of economic pressure, government has chosen to balance the books and to prioritise the rationalisation of its existing cultural agencies as a contribution.
 
“As a result we will work methodically and calmly to continue to deliver a vibrant and effective expert service for the public who rightly expect excellent, sustainable museums, libraries and record offices in their local neighbourhoods. Our accent is on strong strategic leadership; access to expert advice which can help people to weather the effects of recession; strong investment programmes; joining up across the network; good links into local government, and provision of resources that demonstrate good practice. We are committed to arguing for these to be reflected clearly in the new arrangements.
 
”MLA is currently engaged with local authorities and independent museums, libraries and archives all over the country. We are helping them to weather the storm of recession and funding cuts and to emerge stronger and more sustainable. Maintaining the tempo of this work will continue to be a major priority for us.
 
Ed Vaizey, Minister for Culture, comments: “Sir Andrew Motion and Roy Clare have shown great leadership of the MLA and have made great strides in the last two years to streamline the organisation, significantly improving efficiency and effectiveness. However, there is now an opportunity to integrate Renaissance and the other important functions of the MLA into the wider cultural framework.”
 
The MLA believes that cultural and artistic activities are at the heart of Britain’s recovery. Museums, libraries, archives and other places of art and creativity are nourishment for the spirit and encouragement for everyone in times of adversity; these are vital components for tourism, the economy, quality of life, cultural creativity and personal well-being. In the current climate especially, museums, libraries and other cultural services are at significant risk.
 
The MLA has called for more creative and systematic planning to ensure the public get the most out of the sector. The prospectus that we launched this year, ‘Sharper Investment for Changing Times’, recognises that around three quarters of the £2bn-plus spent on cultural services in England is in the control of local, not central, government.
 
Sir Andrew Motion and Roy Clare add:
 
“Over the year or so ahead our focus is on continuing to boost the impact and potential of museums, libraries and archives in locations across the country. An economy only slowly emerging from recession and pressures on public spending provide the spur to make even greater efforts to deliver social, economic and environmental benefits for people and communities.
“Our various programmes and the expertise of our staff, including the Field Teams across the country, will continue unabated. Many longer term decisions will need to be taken and the outcome in October of the government’s Spending Review will have a pivotal bearing on the details.
 
“It is our firm, joint intention to continue to provide strong and visible national leadership and a consistent, purposeful voice. We are confident that the various important capabilities of the MLA will be found new homes and we are determined to ensure that there continues to be sources of robust advocacy for museums, libraries and archives and for the people and places that depend upon them; with provision of experts, know-how, advice, specialist resources, detailed research and evidence and informed guidance. 
 
“We are already working closely with local government and with professional colleagues in the Local Government Association, Arts Council England, Heritage Lottery Fund and a number of leading museums and other key organisations. These relationships are strong and will become stronger. Place-based investment, with much more joined-up and better strategic planning, can and must deliver more for less; closer attention to demand and better systems for delivery must result from all new alignments.
 
“Specific partnership work is already in hand on a Ministerial initiative to develop and improve library services; this will continue, and will be delivered by MLA and LGA this autumn, unaffected by the announcement. We have also put specific proposals to Ministers about the future of Renaissance in the Regions and its relationship to the strategy for archives; further work is in hand that will lead to consultation and a statement by Ministers later this year, in time for new elements to be adopted during 2011 and the ensuing years, subject to funding.
 
“As an example of our specialist resources, we have just agreed to second an MLA expert, Natasha Innocent, to RaceOnline 2012 for 6 months from September. Natasha will work with Martha Lane Fox and her team to help deliver their Manifesto for a Networked Nation; and specifically to ensure that public library services are fully integrated in moves to secure positive digital outcomes for people in Britain.
 
“We are also proud of our range of cultural services, including Acceptance in Lieu, National Security Advisor, Export Licensing, Reviewing Committee, Accreditation, Designation and Government Indemnity. These will be maintained throughout the transition as will our engagement with the Cultural Festival, a vital component of London’s 2012 Olympics, especially in terms of our support and leadership for Stories of the World and Our Sporting Life.
 
“The members of the MLA Board join us in expressing our very sincere gratitude to the staff of the MLA for all their work to date; and together we will uppermost in mind their interests and those of our many professional stakeholders across the country as we work to secure the future for the MLA’s many valuable capabilities and ensure their sustained effectiveness on behalf of the public.
 
Review of Arm's Length Bodies
DCMS:  26 July 2010
http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/news_stories/7280.aspx
A number of our public bodies are set to be merged, abolished or streamlined
 

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Monday, 26 July 2010

Dishing the Dirt

Yesterday I had a very pleasant and educational afternoon looking at Roman coins, Anglo Saxon jewellery, belt buckles, rare Anglo Saxon coins, lead weights from a long extinct market, Norman "bling" and Civil War musket and pistol balls, some of which had obviously hit something...
This was part of the Archaeology Day at The Edward Jenner Museum, Berkeley, where the finds that had been discovered over the last few years on the University of Bristol digs were displayed and a very interesting talk given by Pete Twinn, Archaeologist and Metal Detectorist. One could also try Geo Physics (a la Time Team) in an undug part of the garden and a field walk looking for finds on the freshly dug spoil from the last trench that had been dug in June.
I know a lot about various periods of history but as for the Anglo Saxon era I'm still learning. The decoration and beauty of the tiny Anglo Saxon finds were quite breathtaking, especially as we tend to think of the Anglo Saxons as a fairly uncultured bunch who were rescued from obscurity by the invading Normans of 1066. Far from it.
It was the Normans who killed off all the beautiful art and decorative pieces by subjugating the population, building their massive castles and waging economic warfare on the Anglo Saxons. The latter had to conform to survive and so much that was existing before 1066 was lost. It is thought provoking to realise that one fifth of land in the UK is owned by the descendants of those invading Norman Knights from 1066.
The medieval bling was mainly pendants, coins and some heraldic pieces that may have been worn on a horse or on armour. Some heraldic devices have been identified and so we know that these people visited Berkeley, even if it is not backed up by written evidence anywhere else. The medieval weights and measures found demonstrate a thriving market and the slag found helps to confirm that there was a mint in Berkeley too.
The Civil War finds were interesting as the Museum's garden was a battlefield as well as that of the adjoining 13th Century church. Have a look at the West Door and you can still see the musket loops, bullet holes and axe marks from the fight. The defences at Berkeley were started in 1643 and these were found this summer by the University dig. Another piece of corroborating evidence was the number of pistol balls found on the site: we know that after Prince Rupert was defeated at Bristol that cavalry was sent to Berkeley, and they all carried pistols. And there is the evidence, a great quantity of small calibre pistol balls.
It is odd sitting in a tranquil garden on a sunny day, listening to the history (often violent) off the patch of land your are sitting on, but I am looking forward to the next Archaeology Day at the Museum as seeing what has been found and having the privilege of one to one talks from the experts who found the finds, and place them in context in the garden's history is fascinating and has inspired me to learn more about our Anglo Saxon forefathers.
For events at the Museum see www.jennermuseum.com and look out for the talk by Dr Stuart Prior from the University of Bristol, on the history of the site (including the exciting Roman discoveries in Berkeley) in the Old Cyder House.






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Friday, 9 July 2010

An Evening with the Angel of Death

The Angel of Death is one name given to smallpox, the deadly disease that killed millions throughout human history, and a new book has recently been written on the subject by Gareth Williams, a Trustee of the Edward Jenner Museum. On Thursday 22nd July he will be giving a talk “The House on the 13th Milestone: who really discovered vaccination?” at the Old Cyder House in Berkeley. The talk will draw on his book and introduces new angles to the story of how Jenner discovered vaccination.
 
While the account of Edward Jenner and his development of a vaccine against smallpox is well known, Gareth Williams will take the audience further into history with new and expanded information covering Edward Jenner’s experiments involving his gardener’s son with cowpox right up to 1980 when the World Health Organisation officially announced the eradication of the deadly disease.
 
Sarah Parker, the Director of the Edward Jenner Museum said We are delighted to welcome Gareth both as a Trustee and an energetic supporter of the Museum. He has told a compelling story in his book and we look forward to an entertaining and informative evening.
 
The talk is one of a series on medical subjects this year, linked to the Museum’s celebrations of the eradication of Smallpox, which has resulted in much coverage both in the UK and internationally – the small Gloucestershire town of Berkeley has been the global focus of honouring Edward Jenner’s work.
 
The Old Cyder House talks take place throughout the year covering a variety of subjects from a wide range of speakers: not all are medically related. Future talks will be covering North Wales’ Ffestiniog & Welsh Highland Railways and the Loch Ness Monster!
 
All talks have proven popular so reserve your tickets now by contacting the Museum on 01453 810631 or emailing info@edwardjenner.co.uk , Gareth Williams’ talk will start at 7.30pm and cost £10 per person which includes a glass of wine or juice. 

More details can be found on the museum website, www.jennermuseum.com where there is also information on hiring The Old Cyder House and about other events at the Museum.

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Monday, 10 May 2010

Time Travelling Doctor Meets His Public

Visitors to The Edward Jenner Museum, Berkeley, attending Dr Jenner’s Garden Party on Sunday 16th May will witness Time Travel as Dr Jenner returns to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the Eradication of Smallpox as well as his 261st Birthday. He will be joined by more modern recognisable faces such as Prof Mark Horton of BBC Coast fame, invited VIPS from the world of medicine and science and of course our visitors!

Generously sponsored by The Royal Society who celebrate their own 350th Anniversary, the Garden Party is joining in the world celebrations of the eradication of smallpox with visitors invited to explore Dr Jenner's former home with the help of a smallpox nurse, a barber surgeon, servants and the great man himself. There will be a local craft fair in the Old Cyder House, period music from the Convivio Medical Quartet, tea on the lawn, book signings of the new smallpox book “Angel of Death” by Prof Gareth Williams, and the opportunity to be made up to look like a smallpox victim!

An insight into the wider history of the site will be provided with the help of the University of Bristol’s Prof Mark Horton and Dr Stuart Prior of The Berkeley Project who will explain the significance of the large hole in the museum’s lawn which is believed to be the site of an Anglo Saxon nunnery. The 300 year old Attic Rooms will be open for guided tours (must be booked on the day) where you may catch a glimpse of the Attic Ghost, or you can join in with the special period games on the lawn.

Museum Director Sarah Parker said This special anniversary event will be a mixture of interactive drama, fun and exploration with costumed guides adding to the period feel. An enjoyable and memorable Sunday beckons.

Sarah Parker will be flying to Geneva the following day at the invitation of the World Health Organization to represent the Museum at the unveiling of a commemorative statue for the smallpox eradication anniversary. She will be travelling with a film crew to record the event. On Monday 17th May, Jenner’s birthday, a BBC1 (West) Documentary on Jenner’s life is being broadcast at 7.30pm.

Children arriving at the Garden Party dressed in 18/19th Century costume will get free entry, normally £2.50 and for adults it is £5.00. The gates open at 11am on Sunday May 16th and will close at 5.30pm. The Joint Tickets with Berkeley Castle are not valid for this event but may be used on normal museum open days.

For more information see www.jennermuseum.com or call 01453 810631

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Tuesday, 27 April 2010

Time Travelling Doctor to Visit Berkeley

Visitors to The Edward Jenner Museum, Berkeley, attending Dr Jenner’s Garden Party on Sunday 16th May will be excited to learn that they will be witnessing Time Travel as Dr Jenner returns to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the Eradication of Smallpox as well as his 261st Birthday. In what will be the museum’s biggest event of the year the May weekend will be marking the 214th anniversary of the first vaccination on Friday 14th May and Jenner's Birthday on Monday 17th May.

Generously sponsored by The Royal Society who celebrate their own 350th Anniversary, the Garden Party is joining in the world celebrations of the eradication of smallpox with visitors invited to explore Dr Jenner's former home with the help of a smallpox nurse, a barber surgeon, servants and the great man himself. There is something for all the family: a craft fair in the Old Cyder House, period music from a string quartet, refreshments, and  the opportunity to be made up to look like a smallpox victim!

Also on offer an insight into the wider history of the historic site, dating back to the Anglo-Saxon period and possibly beyond with the help of members of The Berkeley Project from the University of Bristol who will start their annual dig on the following day.  A display of finds from the garden will show how much has been learned about what took place on what is believed to be the site of an Anglo Saxon nunnery.

The 300 year old Attic Rooms will be opened up to explore (must be booked on the day) and you may catch a glimpse of the Attic Ghost, or you can join in with the special period games on the lawn. A great day out beckons!

Children arriving at the Garden Party dressed in 18/19th Century costume will get free entry, normally £2.50 and for adults it is £5.00.The gates open at 11am on Sunday May 16th and will close at 5.30pm. The Joint Tickets with Berkeley Castle are not valid for this event but may be used on normal museum open days.

For more information see www.jennermuseum.com or call 01453 810631

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Wednesday, 17 March 2010

Something Unexpected in Jenner’s Garden

Dr Stuart Prior, of TV fame, from the University of Bristol will be talking about the many finds and history revealed from the Berkeley Project dig of 2009. While searching for conclusive evidence of an Anglo-Saxon nunnery a pit possibly holding Edward Jenner’s rubbish was found at the end of the garden of the 300 year old Chantry. This and other discoveries will be shared with the public on Thursday 25th March in Berkeley.

 

There have been archaeological digs at the Edward Jenner Museum since 2005 when the museum granted the University of Bristol permission to conduct their search for Saxon Berkeley within the grounds. As part of the Berkeley Project, a possible Anglo-Saxon church near St Mary’s Church Tower which borders the museum garden has been uncovered. If the remains of Anglo-Saxon buildings in the garden can be linked to it, and they turn out to be part of the Anglo-Saxon nunnery then it will prove to be the earliest nunnery excavated and put Berkeley on the world map again.

 

Dr Prior, a former gravedigger, is the fieldwork director for the Berkeley Project. Viewers of Time Team will recognise him as the larger than life biker-archaeologist with an infectious enthusiasm for his subject as well as other appearances on the National Geographic channel.

 

Sarah Parker, the Museum Director said: It has been really fascinating to see the Anglo-Saxon world beneath our lawn emerge in the last couple of years. We look forward to this year’s dig with increasing excitement. The discovery of Jenner’s rubbish pit is of course of special interest to us providing a tangible link with the his life here.

 

Organised by The Edward Jenner Museum, the Old Cyder House Talks have proved to be very popular, so much so that they have been extended beyond the original March end date to become year round.  Dr Prior’s talk will cost £10 per person including a glass of wine and starts at 7.30pm

More information can be found on the museum website, www.jennermuseum.com where there is also information on hiring The Old Cyder House and about other events at the Museum. Bookings for all the talks can be made in advance by calling 01453 810631 or emailing info@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

- ENDS -

Notes:

 

THE OLD CYDER HOUSE, Berkeley, Gloucestershire

 

 

1) The Old Cyder House is at Dr Edward Jenner’s former home, The Chantry, in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Dr Jenner lived in the house from 1785-1823, and it was from here that he pioneered the world-changing vaccination against Smallpox.

 

The Old Cyder House is available for training, conferences, business meetings, product launches and exhibitions throughout the year and is situated in the Old Coach House, where cider was originally brewed, hence the name.

 

2) Doctor Stuart Prior, the biker-archaeologist, is a teaching fellow in the Department of Archaeology & Anthropology, Bristol University, and the Fieldwork Director for the Berkeley Castle Project. Stuart.Prior@bristol.ac.uk

 

Ticketing details/costs & further information, please see: www.jennermuseum.com

 

General information and booking: info@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

For further information, interviews or image requests please contact:

 

Sarah Parker

Director

 

Email: director@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

Tel:      01453 810 631

Fax:      01453 811 690

 

Posted via email from Copper Phoenix's posterous

Sunday, 7 March 2010

Being Pushed Around in a Haunted Attic

I've just come back from a really fascinating and interesting experience, attending my first organised paranormal investigation. The venue was The Chantry, Berkeley in Gloucestershire: a 300 year old building and former home of Dr Edward Jenner. But this site has more to do with history than just the good doctor. It has been in turn (possibly) a Roman villa, a nunnery, burial ground, scene of a Viking attack and Civil War battlefield. Quite a lot of potential there for meeting spirits and that ignores any possibility of meeting the Witch of Berkeley and the dreaded flesh eating Berkeley Toad.
 
We gathered at 9pm for a briefing and introduction to our medium and host for the night, Craig and Claire respectively. A number of the group had been on such investigations before and knew what to expect but there were a sprinkling of sceptics, those on the fence about supernatural activity, and the believers.
 
We started with meditation and a group exercise (I usually hate these) to demonstrate how we can feel natural energy around us and so identify when something supernatural maybe happening. Even this simple exercise of "sharing energy" with someone else was worth the trip alone, as we held hands over each other.s in turn and could feel the energy between our palms - even squashing and bouncing the energy. Very weird.
 
Then it was into The Chantry for a history lesson to set the scene for the group, Craig was left in the "base room" so he would not hear what was said, so we could check his facts later if he made contact with various spirits. As part of the tour was in the garden at nearly 10pm and it was rapidly dropping below zero and frost forming everywhere this was an event for hardy souls.........
 
We then went back to the base room for a warming coffee and Jaffa cake before heading back to The Chantry with Craig and this time all the lights off. Exploring a familiar building (as I have worked there for some time) in torch light instantly made it far more interesting, especially as Craig started picking up on things straightaway. I won't be able to remember everything that was said between then and 3am, and I don't want to spoil a visit you might make, but will try to summarise. We knew ourselves that there were recorded instances of "ghosts" but had not told Craig or Claire. Craig picked up on a spirit (a ghost is a simple apparition and can't be communicated with, a spirit one can communicate with) who was annoyed that we were in his house. This turned out to be one of Edward Jenner's descendants and he followed us around for the rest of the night. Later a spirit of a dog was discovered, even sitting on a couple of people's feet.
 
We went up to the Attic, the most atmospheric part of The Chantry, and here had some of our most interesting experiences, one of which influenced the title of this blog. Before we conducted a seance, we used dowsing rods, crystals and EMF electronic readers to see if we could find anything in the Attic. My EMF reader suddenly went haywire with lights and sounds whizzing off the scale - witnessed by Craig who once he'd checked I was using the meter correctly nodded and said "that's pretty cool!". After these experiments we gathered for a seance.
 
We made contact with a four year old child, with red hair, called Jonathan. He knew his mother, was slightly afraid of her, but didn't know who his father was: we don't have any record of such a child but he may be in a census somewhere of the servants. We all stood in a circle (well, a very squashed circle as there was no room!) holding hands and invited the spirits to make contact. We had a few small "taps" and something small was thrown behind me. I should mention here that I was standing in a doorway (with my back to it) and so you can imagine my "delight" when Craig and Claire both said that there was lots of movement behind me. My neck had been tingling for sometime but I was putting this down to autosuggestion until the spirit was invited to come into the circle. At this point I felt myself being gently pushed forward, it was very gentle, but insistent and it made me rock forward on my feet, I put it down to me simply swaying but when I tried to return to upright there was this pushing again. Claire, next to me said "Tim is trying to rationalise being pushed by a spirit!" as she was being pushed froward to. I can only describe it as if someone was holding a mattress against me, upright, then pushing slowly but with intent. I could feel the energy we'd been shown earlier in our group exercise.
 
I didn't find this frightening, just immensely curious and fascinating, then it stopped and someone on the opposite side of the room was pushed, and so it went on. We were told that it was Jonathan, the four year old, running around the Attic and pushing us for fun - those "sensitives" who could see/sense him said he was really enjoying it, chuckling and singing "Ring a Ring of Roses". I felt absurdly pleased that we were being the source of so much fun for a four year old spirit at just gone midnight in a deserted Attic. This went on for a few minutes until the spirits of Robert and Henry Jenner appeared in turn (at which point Jonathan ran off). They were far sterner and not so pleased at us invading the Attic and their home.
 
Next we went down to the old bedrooms, where children crying in a room identified as the nursery earlier, but the unpleasant fact here was the sensitives picked up on Jenner's family, wife and children, dying of TB. Very sobering. We spent some time siting in the dark and communicating with a spirit seemingly through the alarm sensor, he making it flash in the dark. We had to take each other's word that none of us were waving are arms around. However no one disputed the footsteps and tapping heard outside the shut door, on the landing. As I was closest to the door I was the one nominated to open it and look out - I have to admit this was the scariest part of the evening for me, opening a door onto the unknown, having listened to footsteps just outside in an empty house, what would I see? As it turned out not a thing......so was that good or a bad, what had made the noises?
 
After some more contact we returned to the base room for more coffee. It was now 2am and we only had an hour left, so we decoded to try the downstairs rooms with table and glass. I found this bit really fascinating, talking to the spirits through the movement of a glass, held by 4/5 people with their fingers on it. Having seen this on TV I'd always cynically assumed that it was being controlled by those touching it. But watching the glass move around the table and twisting at the same time it was obviously physically impossible for those "directing" it to twist it too. We asked some historical questions of the spirits, Robert and Henry Jenner, and they seemed to answer correctly - perhaps we could find out much more of the unknown history of The Chantry this way?
 
As we drew to the end of the evening, the spirits seemed to be increasingly more interested in us and even started picking favourites and poking fun at individuals. Finally at 3am when we had to go, they indicated they'd be pleased to see us again.......maybe.
 
At the end of the evening I have to say I'd enjoyed it very much. Do I think the existence of ghosts and spirits had been proved? I don't know. I know that the pushing force I had on me acted on my entire body quite unbidden, the tappings sounded genuine, not random creaks and information coming from the spirits was often confirmed through the knowledge of the museum staff. If Craig had "swotted up" on the Jenner family history he would have had to have spent weeks looking into great detail to come up with some of the answers he shared with us. On top of this I've had one or two unexplained things happen to me in the building before, when on my own.
 
I leave therefore with an open mind. When I''m up in the Attic next (hopefully in daylight....) I'll think about Jonathan and perhaps even sense his little mischievous presence, I'll watch out for the dog pushing past me on the stairs and the stern descendants of Jenner who are unsure about these invaders in "their house".
 
Would I recommend it - without doubt! It is a must try experience and I thoroughly endorse it as a fun and bizarre evening. I'd like to try The Chantry again and see what else comes up. But a word of caution, don't expect to get much done the following morning, I wasn't in bed until 4.30am!
 
My thanks to our excellent hosts Craig and Claire of Haunted Happenings who ran the event, I'm sure The Chantry will open its doors again one night soon for the spirits to make contact once again, if they are in the mood!
 
Keep looking at www.jennermuseum.com for information.

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Tuesday, 2 March 2010

PRESS RELEASE: Things that go Bump in the Night

*** Press Release ***

Edward Jenner Museum

Immediate Release

2/3/2010

Things that go Bump in the Night

This weekend sees the first overnight paranormal investigation at the Edward Jenner Museum, Berkeley, with a small group of intrepid explorers investigating the claims made by past inhabitants that the 300 year old Chantry is haunted. In conjunction with Haunted Happenings who are running the event, high on the agenda will be spending time in the only recently opened Attic Rooms, the old servants quarters of the building which have remained largely undisturbed for decades, where a possible ghost photograph was taken last year.

In The Chantry’s three centuries of history there have been reports of all sorts of strange goings on, from spectral figures heading into Dr Jenner’s Study to a phantom dog running up and down the stairs. Interest resurfaced after BBC photographer Chris Sands took what appeared to be a ghost picture up in the newly opened Attic Rooms in 2009. Apart from the main building’s age and history the grounds have seen much too, from a Viking burning of the Anglo-Saxon nunnery (the remains of which can currently be seen in the garden) to Civil War battles, the evidence of which is still found today with musket balls and other finds.

Visitors to the Haunted Happenings event on Saturday 6th March will have the opportunity to visit several haunted spots within the house and grounds of Dr Edward Jenner’s former home, have the history of the site explained to them, take part in vigils and séances and get involved with paranormal experiments throughout the night.

Sarah Parker, Director of the Museum said This will be the first proper paranormal investigation of The Chantry. We have been criticised as a science museum for even mentioning ghosts, but there is nothing in science to disprove them! We look forward to the investigation with great interest.

The event runs from 9pm to 3am and must be pre-booked in advance: spaces are limited. To book go to www.hauntedhappenings.co.uk

 

** Ends **

 

 

 

Notes to Editors:

The Chantry is home to The Edward Jenner Museum, pioneer of smallpox vaccination, and opens for the 2010 season on 1st April.

See www.jennermuseum.co.uk

 

The Ghost Event is being run by Haunted Happenings who run ghost events throughout the UK, all bookings and questions about the event should be directed to them

See www.hauntedhappenings.co.uk

 

 

 

For further information, interviews and images please contact:

Tim Davies of Copper Phoenix  www.copperphoenix.co.uk

E:            tim@copperphoenix.co.uk

T/M:      07919 914512

 

 

Posted via email from Copper Phoenix's posterous

Thursday, 18 February 2010

Is Prison right for you?

Members are being sought to join the Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) at Leyhill Open Prison.  The IMB acts independently of the Prison Service and their role is to monitor the complete range of activities within the prison to ensure the fair and just treatment of those held in custody.  

Formerly a wartime hospital, HMP Leyhill is the only minimum security prison in the south west of England and has been an important part of the UK Prison Service since 1946.  The prison is capable of holding up to 532 prisoners, 110 of whom are serving life sentences and all of whom are housed not in cells, but in individual rooms in one of three accommodation blocks with open corridors.   

All of the prisoners, who are generally aged 25 and over have been assessed as low risk and many are either serving short term sentences or are nearing the end of their sentence.  Leyhill plays a particularly important role assessing and preparing prisoners for release by providing an environment in which they can assume more responsibility and benefit from opportunities to make decisions for themselves before returning to the outside community. It is in preparing those approaching release, especially those serving life sentences, to return to the community that is the key to Leyhill’s whole ethos.   

A wide range of opportunities are available to the prisoner to help prepare for release, from academic and vocational courses to opportunities to work outside either doing voluntary work or in local organisations who support the hundred or so prisoners who leave the prison daily on licence.  All those not working outside the prison will be either employed in one of the many maintenance or service activities, or be in education. The only exceptions being those out on licence to go on home leave, which is part of the preparation for transition back into society, or those past retirement age.  

It is in this environment which is not exposed to the normal scrutiny of everyday life, that the IMB carry out their duties, acting as the eyes and ears of the community to ensure that fairness and respect is given to those in custody, and that they are treated humanely.  There is no need for a legal background, but just an open and questioning attitude together with an ability to communicate with a wide range of people and a willingness to work as part of a team.  

IMB members enjoy a high level of trust and responsibility and are free to visit anywhere within the prison at any time and without the need to make an appointment.  There is a great deal of communication with staff and prisoners and with an ever changing prison population, the IMB is seeking to recruit younger people, working people and those from ethnic minorities to reflect that population. 

Members of IMB Boards come from all walks of life and although IMB work is voluntary, travel and training expenses are covered. Volunteering involves commitment to two or three days a month on a rota basis, each visit taking several hours and requiring  visits to all parts of the prison.  IMB volunteers, who have to undergo a security clearance process before they can be accepted for the role, are also expected to live reasonably close to the prison, and to attend monthly IMB meetings.  

As part of a drive to recruit additional volunteers to join the Independent Monitoring Board (IMB), prospective applicants are being invited to visit HMP Leyhill, meet members of the IMB and experience at first hand what life is like in one of the UK’s busiest open prisons.  Anyone who is interested and would like to know more about what is involved in becoming a member of the IMB are asked to contact the IMB Clerk on 01454 264112 or email Pat.Carpenter@hmps.gsi.gov.uk to make an appointment on either Friday 5th March or Saturday 6th March 2010.

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Wednesday, 10 February 2010

Asbestos Legislation may catch out Landlords

 

*** Press Release ***

80 Twenty Projects

Immediate Release

Asbestos Legislation may catch out Landlords

With tougher asbestos legislation now in force it is likely to catch out many landlords who previously thought they would be unaffected. New clearer guidance means that for many landlords and their staff / sub-contractors, any of the properties they manage need to be checked for Asbestos. This covers anything from warehouses through to domestic tenanted flats. Tim Ashley-King of 80 Twenty Projects believes many companies and individuals will end up being fined through a general lack of understanding of these issues.

The ‘duty to manage asbestos’ requirements of regulation 4 of the Control of Asbestos Regulations (CAR) 2006 do not normally apply to individual domestic premises, however, the requirements do apply to common parts of premises such as foyers, corridors, lifts, staircases and gardens etc, including housing developments and blocks of flats. Many landlords are fully aware if this.

What is rarely understood is that The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, requires all employers to ensure their employees will not be exposed to health and safety (Asbestos) risks, to provide health & safety information to others who may be affected, and places legal duties on employers and the self employed, towards people not in their employment. Landlords therefore need to assess any Asbestos risks to third parties, e.g. tenants who may be affected by their activities, and make appropriate arrangements to protect them.

These requirements mean that organisations such as private landlords, local authorities, housing associations, social housing management companies and others who own, or are responsible for, domestic properties, have legal duties to ensure the health and safety of their staff (and others) in domestic premises, and this is where organisations are likely to be caught out by legislation.

Asbestos can be found many buildings built before the year 2000, in floor tiles, various fire retarding panels, boiler rooms, roof spaces and even in ‘Artex’. It is an easily overlooked, and hard to identify material. It was a commonly used throughout the 1950’s, to 1990’s, before its carcinogenic life-threatening legacy was fully understood. Currently in the UK it is responsible for over 4,000 deaths per year, as a result of past exposures.

As employers, organisations have duties to identify asbestos. Tim Ashley-King said I believe that we will see an increasing number of prosecutions through a lack of awareness of Asbestos legislation. 80 Twenty Projects can help prevent this through providing training to identify and deal with the problem, or by conducting Asbestos Surveys and advising on Asbestos Management Strategies.

80 Twenty Projects is a Bristol based Asbestos specialist company covering the UK and deals with everything from houses and schools to small shops and even fire damaged supermarkets. Tim Ashley-King said We are a growing company and currently are recruiting for competent Asbestos Surveyors. Anyone interested should send us a CV and covering letter. It is likely to be busy in the next few months!

Further information on Asbestos can be found on www.8020projects.co.uk and on the HSE Website.

 

** Ends **

 

Notes to Editors:

80 Twenty Projects is based in Bristol and run by Tim Ashley-King. Operating on a nationwide basis, they are able to offer a range of services including:

             Asbestos Surveys, Asbestos Bulk Sample Analysis, Re-Inspection

             Asbestos Management Plans

             Asbestos Training, Health and Safety Training

             Tender Design and Specification, Contractor Selection, Project Management

             Qualitative Face Fit Testing for RPE

             Fire Risk Assessments

             Health and Safety, Health and Safety Risk Assessment

             Health and Safety Policy and Health and Safety Audits

 

www.8020projects.co.uk

 

For further information, interviews and images please contact:

Tim Davies of Copper Phoenix

E:            tim@copperphoenix.co.uk

T/M:      07919 914512

 

  

--
Tim Davies

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

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Wednesday, 3 February 2010

The militant Sikh Princess and other secret stars of Hampton Court Palace

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

 

The Edward Jenner Museum

 

For Immediate Release

 

29/01/10
 
 

The militant Sikh Princess and other secret stars of Hampton Court Palace

 

 

Sarah Parker, the director of the Edward Jenner Museum will be giving a talk Suffragettes, Soldiers & Servants: Behind the Scenes of the Hampton Court Palace Community 1750 - 1950 on Thursday 25th February at the Old Cyder House in Berkeley. This will be the sixth of The Old Cyder House Talks for 2010 on interesting and diverse subjects. Sarah Parker will be sharing the story of the lesser known characters of this famous royal residence.

 

Hampton Court Palace in Surrey is located next to the river Thames and from 1236 the site was used by knights, courtiers, cardinals and kings. Less famous is the hidden community of the palace who following George II’s decision in the mid 18th Century to break with the tradition begun by Henry VIII not to live there, moved into a series of apartments granted to those who found favour after services rendered to crown or country. Sarah Parker spent ten years curating at Hampton Court Palace. She will share the stories of the eclectic mix of palace residents including Michael Faraday, the chemist and physicist who discovered electromagnetic induction and the militant Indian suffragette Princess Sophia, daughter of Maharajah Duleep Singh.

 

Sarah Parker said: Hampton Court Palace has been home to an extraordinary community who lived in grace and favour apartments and lived lives dramatic enough to rival their royal predecessors. Eastenders has nothing on these South-Westenders.

 

Organised by The Edward Jenner Museum, the Old Cyder House talks are increasing in popularity, so reserve your tickets now! The Berkeley talk will cost £8 per person including a glass of wine.

More information can be found on the museum website, www.jennermuseum.com where there is also information on hiring The Old Cyder House and about other events at the Museum.

Bookings for all the talks can be made in advance by calling 01453 810631 or emailing info@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

- ENDS -

 

Notes to Editors:

 

THE OLD CYDER HOUSE, Berkeley, Gloucestershire

 

 

1) The Old Cyder House is at Dr Edward Jenner’s former home, The Chantry, in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Dr Jenner lived in the house from 1785-1823, and it was from here that he pioneered the world-changing vaccination against Smallpox.

 

The Old Cyder House is available for training, conferences, business meetings, product launches and exhibitions throughout the year and is situated in the Old Coach House, where cider was originally brewed, hence the name.

 

Ticketing details/costs & further information, please see: www.jennermuseum.com

 

General information and booking: info@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

For further information, interviews or image requests please contact:

 

Sarah Parker

Director

 

Email: director@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

Tel:      01453 810 631

Fax:      01453 811 690

 

 

Posted via email from Copper Phoenix's posterous

Sunday, 31 January 2010

2010 RBS Six Nations

I have always followed and loved the Six Nations Rugby or Five Nations as it was. I am not a great follower of sport; I don’t follow a particular regional team and tend to only watch big tournaments, like the world cup in football.

But the Six Nations is very special to me, as it was something as a young boy in the 1970’s the family would come together on the Saturday afternoons to sit and watch the rugby and importantly to watch Wales win.

Proud of my Welsh roots I was lucky to grow up in the 1970’s when Wales just won all the time (ok I know there was the occasional defeat but it was so rare as to not worry about!).  Triple Crowns, Grand Slams and championships abounded, until that dreadful time in the 1980’s when Welsh Rugby took a slide downhill.  We’d lost the household names of Barry John, Phil Bennett, Gareth Edwards, JPR Williams etc and new players were coming in who I didn’t really know. Of course in the 1980’s the pits were closing and the traditional Valley living experience was changing: as the pits closed local rugby teams disappeared and there was not the scope to nurture new rugby talent. We’re talking of a time, as JPR Williams said recently, when the team would turn up on the weekend, play for Wales and go back to their normal jobs on a Monday. The amateur game at its best.

I remember being taken by my dad and grandfather to Phil Bennett’s sports shop in Llanelli to get a Welsh Rugby Union strip for myself and my brother. As a tongue tied eight year old it was an awesome experience meeting one of my heroes, having my hair ruffled by him. I was deeply proud of that rugby strip and wore it for years, even when it was too small for me!

Recently the great commentator Bill McLaren, the voice of my rugby childhood died and I felt another link with that happy time gone.  His voice and unbiased commentary was a fantastic combination and whenever I sit to watch any rugby I automatically think of his voice and wish he was still commentating.

I met my Welsh rugby heroes one last time at a benefit concert in Cardiff, in the early 1990’s. They were much older and less fit, but I still felt the same tongue tied excitement at being in the same room as Gareth Edwards, Barry John and Phil Bennett. I doubt it will ever change.

But this year will be touched with melancholy as it will be the first year I watch the tournament without any of my family who sat around our television in the 1970’s. My father died in the early 1990’s, my brother moved to France 11 years ago and my mother died in October last year.  No more the trip to my parents’ house to enjoy an afternoon of rugby, in companionship and echoes of yesteryear.

So this year I expect Wales to win the Six Nations as a fitting tribute to all our happy years together and to kick off the years to come. I will raise a toast to the past next week when the tournament kicks off and look to the future as I enjoy the classic grudge match of the tournament, in tune once again with the Land of my Fathers: Wales v England.

--
Tim Davies

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

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Thursday, 21 January 2010

What has Berkeley Ever Done for Us?

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

 

The Edward Jenner Museum

 

For Immediate Release

 

20/01/10

 

What has Berkeley Ever Done for Us?

 

 

Tim Davies, of Copper Phoenix Heritage will be giving a talk “Berkeley: A Town that Changed the World” on Thursday 28th January at the Old Cyder House in Berkeley. This will be the first of The Old Cyder House Talks for 2010, on interesting and diverse subjects. Tim Davies will be highlighting Berkeley’s significant contributions to world history in an informal way on a winter’s evening. 

 

What has the Gloucestershire town ever done for the rest of the World? Well it’s most famous son invented immunology, inhabitants colonised America, started wars and there is an ongoing contribution today through archaeological discoveries. Tim Davies who runs Copper Phoenix, a heritage marketing and business consultancy has worked in Berkeley since 2006 on the Berkeley Estate and at The Edward Jenner Museum. He has put together an affectionate tribute to the town and its significant influence on world events, especially as the Town’s profile will be raised this year, the 30th Anniversary of the eradication of Smallpox, made possible by the town’s most famous son, Edward Jenner. Apart from Jenner, expect reference to the town from prehistoric times, through Roman and Saxons, Vikings and up to the present today

 

Tim Davies said, There are plenty of historians who can give a more in depth talk on dates, times and events, connected with Berkeley, I want to highlight the vast influence that such a small town in Gloucestershire has over us all. It is really out of all proportion to the town’s size and population!

 

Organised by The Edward Jenner Museum, the Old Cyder House talks are increasing in popularity, so reserve your tickets soon. The Berkeley talk will cost £8 per person including a glass of wine.

 

Sarah Parker, Museum Director said: We are proud of Berkeley’s complex heritage and feel that the town should be far better known worldwide. Tim’s talk will hopefully point out the need to highlight Berkeley’s many achievements!

More information can be found on the museum website, www.jennermuseum.com where there is also information on hiring The Old Cyder House and about other events at the Museum. Bookings for all the talks can be made in advance by calling 01453 810631 or emailing info@edwardjenner.co.uk                

- ENDS -

Notes to Editors:

 

THE OLD CYDER HOUSE, Berkeley, Gloucestershire

 

 

1) The Old Cyder House is at Dr Edward Jenner’s former home, The Chantry, in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Dr Jenner lived in the house from 1785-1823, and it was from here that he pioneered the world-changing vaccination against Smallpox.

 

The Old Cyder House is available for training, conferences, business meetings, product launches and exhibitions throughout the year and is situated in the Old Coach House, where cider was originally brewed, hence the name.

 

Ticketing details/costs & further information, please see: www.jennermuseum.com

 

General information and booking: info@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

For further information, interviews or image requests please contact:

 

Sarah Parker

Director

 

Email: director@edwardjenner.co.uk

 

Tel:      01453 810 631

Fax:      01453 811 690

 

 

Copper Phoenix Ltd

 

Copper Phoenix was set up to specifically work with heritage organisations, museums and visitor attractions of all sizes requiring heritage advice. It offers solutions for businesses that may not be able to afford (or want) a full time marketeer, those that need advice on how their operation is perceived to the public, require guidance and assistance with developing specific projects or simply to increase visitor numbers and awareness.

 

Contact:          Tim Davies

Email:              tim@copperphoenix.co.uk

Tel:                  07919914512

 

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

 

 

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