Historicalphotos

Thursday, 1 December 2011

Feedback on Copper Phoenix's Social Media Sessions at the Freedom Travel Conference

Dear Tim,

Firstly, I must apologise, I never got an opportunity to speak with you at the conference this weekend, although I did sit in on your second session, which I thought was great, well pitched for the audience.

We have received some super feedback, so thank you very much for presenting at our conference and I do hope you manage to pick up some further business as a result.

Many thanks once again

Kind regards,

Alison

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, 15 November 2011

Berkeley Ghosts to be Investigated

*** PRESS RELEASE ***

 

For Immediate Release

 

15/11/11

 

Berkeley Ghosts to be Investigated

 

 

Have you ever wanted to take part in an overnight investigation into the paranormal? Looking for ghosts, spirits and the unexpected in an atmospheric historic setting?

Well now you can join a public event looking for the Ghosts of Berkeley, in a 400 year old building in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, accompanied by historians and mediums to interpret what we can see and possibly some of what we can’t!

 

The Chantry – a 400 year old building on a site with history dating back to prehistoric times -is hosting a paranormal investigation on Saturday 26th November. The evening will start at 8pm and go through until 2am, well beyond the witching hour, commencing with a history tour of the grounds and buildings before teaming up with the mediums who will attempt to interpret any message that come through, while various experiments are set up. A professional photographer will be covering the event

 

Recently staff at The Chantry, which houses the museum dedicated to Dr Edward Jenner, has been documenting activity and ghost sightings from staff and visitors alike adding to the many spooky stories told about the building that have been passed on by previous occupants.

 

The evening is being run and hosted by Copper Phoenix, a heritage consultancy company. Managing Director Tim Davies said There have been some interesting happenings over the years here and previous events have had some bizarre and unexplained activity. We’re looking forward to it!

 

The history of the site covers Roman occupation, an Anglo-Saxon nunnery, the Normans and a Civil War Battlefield, so plenty of potential for restless spirits. Sarah Parker, the Museum Director said: As a science museum we keep an open mind on the existence of ghosts, but we’re as interested as anyone to see if anything transpires

Tickets cost £25 for the evening and more information can be found on the museum website, www.jennermuseum.com , calling             01453 810631       or emailing info@edwardjenner.co.uk(Over 18s only)

 

- ENDS –

 

 

Notes to Editors:

 

COPPER PHOENIX

 

 

Copper Phoenix is a heritage and marketing consultancy and has been involved with Berkeley since 2006, the company is run by Tim Davies who has worked at a number of tourist attractions around the country.

 

Tel:             07919 914512      

Email: tim@copperphoenix.co.uk

 

 

Dr Jenner’s House: Birthplace of Vaccination

The Chantry, Berkeley, Gloucestershire GL13 9BN

 

 

The Chantry is Dr Edward Jenner’s former Queen Anne home, located in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Dr Jenner lived in the house from 1785-1823. It was from here that he pioneered the world-changing vaccination against Smallpox in 1796.

 

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Wednesday, 2 November 2011

Berkeley Ghosts: The Chantry


Berkeley Ghosts: The Chantry
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

Saturday 26th November, from 8pm - 2am, you can join a group of people exploring the 400 year old building with Mediums on hand to talk with any spirits we find!

For more info see www.jennermuseum.com

or call 01453 810 631

Thursday, 20 October 2011

Nelson, Trafalgar and Copper Phoenix

On 21st October 2011 it is the 206th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar where Vice Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson triumphed over the combined Franco-Spanish fleet by employing his new fighting methods christened "The Nelson Touch".
He looked at existing Naval tactics and thought he could improve on them to his advantage and so simply turned his line of battle ships through 90 degrees to attack the Franco-Spanish fleet. Coming in at right angles was a brave and dangerous move, traditional naval doctrine dictated that both sides lined up against each other and traded broadsides: attacking head on meant his lead ships were exposed to enemy fire for a long time without being able to fire back.
His plan, though risky, worked - he won a great victory that made Britain the "Ruler of the Waves" until the beginning of the 20th Century. At the Battle of Jutland in 1916, over one hundred years on, Nelson's tactics were still to the forefront of the Royal Navy's battle plan.
So where does Copper Phoenix, a marketing company, fit into this scenario?
Apart from owner Tim Davies' love of history, he believes like Nelson in looking for new solutions to existing marketing scenarios, exploiting both digital and traditional means to do so. Clients of Copper Phoenix benefit from their existing or proposed marketing plans being analysed, improved upon where necessary and then implemented, either through Copper Phoenix or overseen by the company.
Tim says "Nelson's famous signal 'Engage the enemy more closely' can be taken by marketeers as a call to action. Substitute "enemy" for "client/customer" and we have  a good formula. Engaging with clients we find out what they want and need from the marketplace. Engaging with the customer builds trust and relationships, plus good customer service. It creates dialogue, understanding and ultimately relationships of great mutual benefit. The clients get awareness of their products and services out to a wider audience, the customer has greater access and empathy with the supplier."
The most famous signal at Trafalgar was "England expects that every man will do his duty" - Nelson originally wanted to signal "England confides [i.e. is confident] that every man will do his duty." But Pasco, his Flag Lieutenant, suggested that expects be substituted for confides, as the former word was in the signal book, whereas confides would have had to be spelt out letter-by-letter. Nelson agreed to the change (even though 'expects' gave a less trusting impression than 'confides'!): so, as you can see, even the best occasionally need a consultant's view!
Nelson was a great strategist, and marketing strategy is essential for any business. Without it your business is rudderless, drifting about on the commercial currents.
If you need help with designing a marketing strategy, or want a marketing "health check", Copper Phoenix is able to help out with no obligation.
Tim Davies
www.copperphoenix.co.uk
Digital & Tradititional Marketing

T: 07919 914512
E: tim@copperphoenix.co.uk
Follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/CopperPhoenix

Thursday, 13 October 2011

The Menin Gate: Looking towards Ypres (Ieper)


The Menin Gate: Looking towards Ypres (Ieper)
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is a war memorial in Ypres, Belgium dedicated to the commemoration of British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are unknown. Carved on stone panels are the names of 54,896 Commonwealth soldiers who died in the Salient but whose bodies have never been identified or found. On completion of the memorial, it was discovered to be too small to contain all the names as originally planned. An arbitrary cut-off point of 15 August 1917 was chosen and the names of 34,984 UK missing after this date were inscribed on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing instead. The Menin Gate Memorial does not list the names of the missing of New Zealand and Newfoundland soldiers, who are instead honoured on separate memorials.

Following the Menin Gate Memorial opening in 1927, the citizens of Ypres wanted to express their gratitude towards those who had given their lives for Belgium's freedom. As such, every evening at 20:00, buglers from the local fire brigade close the road which passes under the Memorial and sound the Last Post. Except for the occupation by the Germans in World War II when the daily ceremony was conducted at Brookwood Military Cemetery, in Surrey, England, this ceremony has been carried on uninterrupted since 2 July 1928. On the very evening that Polish forces liberated Ypres in the Second World War, the ceremony was resumed at the Menin Gate despite the fact that heavy fighting was still taking place in other parts of the town.

The ceremony is a solemn occasion, and therefore not intended as entertainment or a tourist attraction. The buglers usually remain at the scene for a short while after the ceremony, at which point appreciation can be expressed in person; it is not considered appropriate to applaud during, or after, the ceremony.

Copper Phoenix is preparing a talk on Ypres and the battles, if you'd like to know more or book please email hello@copperphoenix.co.uk

Tuesday, 14 June 2011

£500K fund to Stimulate Digital Innovation in the Arts

Good to see that the Arts are able to get funding to join in with the explosion of Digital change and reach more people. Too often the Arts are sidelined due to either a lack of funding or a lack of vision from the organisations involved.
 
Tim
 
 
Funding will promote the use of digital technologies to connect with wider audiences and explore new ways of working.

Arts and cultural organisations are being given the opportunity to apply for a share of a half-a-million-pound fund to harness new technology.

The Digital R&D Fund for Arts and Culture was announced today by Arts Council England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the
National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA).

It follows a speech by Culture Minister Ed Vaizey in January where he called on cultural organisations to embrace new technology and the opportunities it offers.

“Our lives are increasingly defined by how we engage and interact with the world digitally and cultural organisations can’t afford to be left behind,” Mr Vaizey said. “Too often finances, structures or traditions can constrain the arts from making best use of the technology which now sits at the heart of many people’s everyday lives.

“This programme seeks to show how digital technology can revolutionise our cultural engagement, helping people to derive greater value from cultural activities and to find new ways to generate income.”

Organisations that are eligible to apply to the programme include visual and performing arts organisations, cultural organisations in England including arts and cultural archives, literary organisations, museums and galleries, libraries, commercial arts and cultural organisations and creative industry businesses. Applications will be open until 2 September 2011.
 

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Wednesday, 8 June 2011

Skeleton found at Edward Jenner's Berkeley house

Archaeologists have uncovered a human skeleton at the former home of vaccination pioneer Dr Edward Jenner.

A team from the University of Bristol unearthed the remains during their annual dig in the garden of The Chantry in Berkeley, Gloucestershire.

The skeleton is believed to date from Roman or pre-Roman times and is said to be extremely rare.

Excavation leader Professor Mark Horton said it was "a completely unexpected but really important discovery".

He added: "It fills in the history between the Roman villa that we believe is on the site and the Anglo-Saxon monastery discovered during earlier digs."
 

Sealed remains

The skeleton is that of an adult, but the sex has not yet been determined.

It was found underneath the sealed remains of part of the Anglo-Saxon Mynster, founded in the 8th Century.

The excavation team, led by Professor Horton and Dr Stuart Prior, has been excavating part of the garden during a series of annual digs since 2007.

They have already established that Berkeley is an important Anglo-Saxon site with a mynster on the same scale and status as Gloucester.

Dr Edward Jenner lived in the house from 1785-1823 and pioneered the world-changing vaccination against smallpox there in 1796.

Visitors to the museum at Dr Jenner's House are able to visit the site and speak to the experts until Thursday 9th June 2011.

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Tuesday, 7 June 2011

St Mere Eglise and Paratrooper "John Steele"


St Mere Eglise and Paratrooper "John Steele"
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

This picture is always popular on 6th June, as it shows the paratrooper dummy placed on the Church in Ste Mere Eglise each summer, commemorating the night of 6th June 1944 when US paratroopers landed in the town square. John Steele's parachute caught on the church tower and he hung there playing dead for a couple of hours before being captured. The event was shown in the film "The Longest Day"

Thursday, 5 May 2011

Get on your Bike!

Calling all riders…we want you to get on your Bike and raise money to help fund the £100million needed over the next five years to continue our life-saving research into better diagnosis, treatments and cures for all those with blood cancers.

The Bristol Bikeathon is back for 2011 and it’s time to set yourself a new challenge!

 

Join us once again for a fantastic day out in the heart of the South West. Starting at the beautiful Ashton Court Estate, Bristol, the route once again promises to be a stunning tour through the park and the picturesque country lanes of the surrounding area.

 

Like all our Bikeathons, the ride is suitable for cyclists of all abilities as you have a choice of either 14 or 28 miles and you are free to go at your own pace - remember, it’s a ride, not a race!

 

For those of you who want to stay behind then we have stalls, face painting, a very large bouncy castle and refreshments. Why not bring a picnic and make a day of it!

 

To enter please go to http://beatbloodcancers.org/event/bristol-bikeathon

 

For further information about the Bristol Bikeathon please contact event organiser Jo Bray at jobray@llrbristol.org.uk

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Tuesday, 26 April 2011

The Restored Temple of Vaccinia


The Restored Temple of Vaccinia
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

Copper Phoenix was able to obtain a grant to restore this Grade II* listed building. It was where Edward Jenner vaccinated the poor for free against smallpox.

It has been rethatched, repointed with lime mortar and a new leaded light window put in.

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

Monday, 18 April 2011

Purton Wrecks - Envoy


Purton Wrecks - Envoy
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

Looking like some sculpture, thi is the first wreck you meet.

These ships were placed here during the 20th Century to reinforce the river bank and protect the canal. See more info at www.friendsofpurton.org.uk/index.html

Sunday, 17 April 2011

Edward Jenner Museum Ghost

Edward Jenner Museum Ghost Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

On Easter Monday 2011 there will be guided tours of the Attic in The Chantry, Berekeley, where the ghost picture was taken given by Tim Davies of Copper Phoenix. To book see www.jennermuseum.com

Severn and Wye Railway Bridge Disaster


Severn and Wye Railway Bridge Disaster
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

Pictured here are the remains of the barges that exploded after crashing into the Severn and Wye Railway Bridge October, 1960.

Just off the foreshore at Purton, two John Harker owned tanker barges, Arkendale H and Wastdale H, carrying 296 tons of black oil and 351 tons of petroleum spirit respectively, collided with the Severn and Wye Railway Bridge. The collision and subsequent explosion not only caused irreparable damage to the bridge, bringing down one of the upright columns and two sections of span, but sadly caused five members of the barges crew to lose their lives and three others to have their lives changed forever.

The bridge was demolished in 1967

Friday, 15 April 2011

Scott & Shackleton's Centenary Trip

While doing some work for my client C The World I came across this awesome trip to the icy south. I'd love to go and see what Scott and Shackleton faced - thankfully in a far more secure way!
 
 
Ross Sea Antarctica - Scott & Shackleton's Centenary 
2012 Departure - January 21
This voyage covers some of the polar regions famously charted during the first race to the South Pole by pioneering explorers Scott and Shackleton exactly 100 years ago. The Ross Sea coast extends from the ice shelf northwards until it reaches the very tip of Victoria Land and Cape Adare. During our time in the Ross Sea Region we will attempt a variety of opportunistic landings, subject to weather conditions.

Bluff (Invercargill), New Zealand – Embark/Disembark

Latitude: 46°35'S
Longitude: 168°18'E

The largest urban centre in New Zealand's Southland is Invercargill, a city of 49,000 people. Visitors come to admire the elegant Victorian and Edwardian buildings, gardens and landscaped parks. The fishing port of Bluff is a half hour drive south from Invercargill and is home to the famous Bluff oyster and a lively annual seafood festival. From Bluff, visitors can catch a ferry to Stewart Island - a haven for native bird life and the only place in New Zealand where you can readily see kiwi in their natural habitat. 

For guests embarking in Bluff we offer a complementary transfer from Invercargill to Orion on the day of Orion’s departure. The transfer is from the city centre departing at about 2pm. Subject to minimum numbers we will also offer a transfer from the Invercargill airport at times to coincide with flight arrivals. If we are able to confirm an airport transfer this will be advised on your travel documents, otherwise a taxi from the airport to the city centre is about $15.

Enderby Island, Auckland Islands – Scenic Zodiac Cruising

Latitude: 50°31'S 
Longitude: 166º17'E

Orion's guests will cruise in Zodiacs in Sandy Bay on Enderby Island at the northern end of Auckland Island, to view a large Hooker Sea Lion colony with pups all jostling for position. If we are fortunate, we may see the rare Yellow-Eyed Penguin as they move to and from their nests in the forests beyond the beach.

Macquarie Island – Wet landing

Latitude: 54°29'S
Longitude: 158°56'E

Often described as one of the "wonder spots" of the world, the sub-Antarctic island of Macquarie has been said to rival South Georgia in its magnificence, scenic diversity and prolific wildlife. Designated a wildlife sanctuary in 1933 and a World Heritage Site in 1977, Macquarie now operates a full-time manned station where biological and meteorological research is conducted. The station, located on the isthmus at Buckles Bay, is from where we will collect the Tasmanian Parks & Wildlife rangers who will be our guides.

 

Sandy Bay, situated halfway down the island's eastern seaboard, is our planned landing site. The Zodiacs will traverse breakwaters of giant kelp before reaching rocky beaches where landing conditions can best be described as "wet and challenging". Once ashore you'll find the bay, with its rugged backdrop of mountains and tussock covered headlands, is home to 20,000 breeding pair of royal penguins, king penguins, rock hopper penguins, gentoo penguins and elephant seals. This profusion of wildlife wasn't always so protected, the rusting remains of machinery used by whalers being stark reminders of the exploitation which took place on the island during its early history.

Ross Sea Region

This southernmost expanse of the Pacific Ocean was named after James Clark Ross who first explored the area in 1841 with two ships, Erebus and Terror.

As seas go, this one is quite shallow and is bounded in the east by the coastal mountains of Victoria Land and in the south by the Ross Ice Shelf. The shelf is a flat topped body of snow covered glacial ice about the size of France which largely floats except along the coastlines. The southern part of the Ross Sea is not navigable for some 9 months of the year and over the summer season between January and March very few ships venture here, and those that do principally supply the various scientific stations.

The Ross Sea coast extends from the ice shelf northwards until it reaches the very tip of Victoria Land and Cape Adare. During our time in the Ross Sea Region we will attempt a variety of opportunistic landings, subject to weather conditions. These may include -

Cape Hallett - Wet landing

Latitude: 72°19'S
Longitude: 170º16'E

Following an intricate approach to Cape Hallett through thick pack ice, we land to inspect the site of an abandoned US/New Zealand base established during the International Geophysical Year in 1957-58. It is a magnificent area with giant glaciers and surrounding mountains of over 4,000 metres. Weddell Seals and Adelie Penguins abound.

Cape Terra Nova Bay - Wet landing
Latitude: 75°80'S
Longitude: 164º24'E

First discovered by Scott during his 1901-1904 expedition, the site is now occupied by an Italian base which operates a summer research station. If permission is granted, we hope to visit the base. It is then intended to cruise by the massive Drygalski ice tongue, which extends 70km out into the Ross Sea as part of the David Glacier.

Inexpressible Island – Wet landing
Latitude: 74°54'S
Longitude: 163º43'E

Home to a small Adelie Penguin rookery this low bleak Island is the site of an amazing story of survival where Scotts Northern party were forced to over-winter in a snow cave. Two plaques mark the site of the cave were the men suffered until their departure on the 30th September 1912 for Ross Island across the sea ice. This is a rarely visited site which is challenging to access but if a visit is successful it is not hard to imagine why the men called this place “Hell with a capital H.”

Cape Evans - Wet landing
Latitude: 77°38'S
Longitude: 166º24'E

Scott's 1911 Terra Nova Hut is the largest historic building in Antarctica. Used in the 1910 to 1913 British Antarctic Expedition, it served as the base for extensive scientific research and surveys as well as Scott's journey to the South Pole. Much of Scott's equipment is well preserved and it is hoped we can enter the hut with guides. Shredded seaweed sown into Jut quilting is used as an insulating layer between the inner and outer cladding of the wood hut. Ten men of Shackleton's ill-fated imperial trans-Antarctic expeditions were marooned here in 1915 after their ship Aurora was blown out to sea and unable to return. Two of Aurora's anchors remain to this day on the beach in front of the hut. Entering the hut provides a window into the historic age of Antarctic exploration and discovery.

Cape Royds - Wet landing
Latitude: 77°32'S
Longitude: 166º12'E

Shackleton's hut at Cape Royds was constructed during the British Antarctic Nimrod Expedition in 1907-1909. Unable to land at King Edward VII Island, he then entered McMurdo Sound. Ice conditions prevented him reaching Hut Point, the site of Scott's hut, so he selected Cape Royds for winter quarters. Adelie Penguins are slowly reclaiming the site which is the world's southernmost penguin rookery. The New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust conservation program has successfully conserved a substantial number of fascinating artifacts in this hut, in such a way that at first sight the hut appears to have only recently been abandoned.

Possession Islands - Wet landing
Latitude: 71°56'S
Longitude: 171º10'E

Subject to sea and ice conditions, we hope to make a landing at the rarely visited small and craggy Possession Islands. One of these, Foyn Island, is covered with Adelie Penguins. The islands were discovered by James Clark Ross and Francis Crozier in 1841 during their expedition to locate the south magnetic pole.

Cape Adare - Wet landing
Latitude: 71°17'S
Longitude: 170º10'E

Cape Adare was discovered by Captain James Ross in 1841. We plan to visit Borchgrevink's Hut from the British Southern Cross Expedition, the first to ever spend winter in the Antarctic, in 1899. Up to 1,000,000 Adelie Penguins have reclaimed the site, which is spectacular, surrounded by black volcanic hills. High above the huts is the lonely grave and cross of Borchgrevink's biologist.

 

Campbell Island – Wet landing

Latitude: 52°33'S 
Longitude: 169º09'E

Campbell Island was first discovered in January 1810 by Captain Frederick Hasselburg, master of the sealing brig, Perseverance. He named the island after his employers Robert Campbell and Co. of Sydney and sadly drowned later that year after a boat capsized in Perseverance Harbour. Campbell is a volcanic island with fascinating rock formations. 50 years ago, between 2 and 3 million Rock Hopper Penguins were nesting on the island but since then 90% have been decimated by bacterial infection. Less than 20 pairs of Wandering Albatross nest are found here. Approximately 8,500 pairs of Royal Albatross and about 74,000 pairs of Black Browed Mollymawk also call the island home. Over 40 other breeds of birds including the Southern Royal Albatross have also been observed on Campbell Island.

Snares Islands, New Zealand – Scenic Zodiac Cruising

Latitude: 47°60'S
Longitude: 166°35'E

Two small rocky islands, North East and Broughton, comprise The Snares, the closest sub-Antarctic islands to New Zealand. The islands are covered with heavy tussock grass and wind-beaten forests of tree daisies. Weather permitting we'll launch our Zodiacs for an exploration of the sheltered eastern coastline as the island's wildlife protection program precludes landings. The Snares are home to huge numbers of breeding birds, 99 recorded species including albatross, Antarctic Terns and Snares Crested Penguins.

For guests disembarking in Bluff we offer a complementary transfer from Orion to Invercargill on the day of arrival. The transfer is to the city centre, or to the Invercargill airport.

 

Although our itinerary to the extreme sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions is based on many years of collective experience, prevailing weather and ice conditions in this area of the world are unpredictable, mother nature dictates our course. These are not cruises they are true expeditions to what can be the most inhospitable region on earth. Bring with you a spirit of adventure and flexibility.

 

 

For more information contact:

 

  C The World

 

 01454 634 070

 

 

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Musketry - 42nd Regiment: The Black Watch


Musketry - 42nd Regiment: The Black Watch
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

This photo proves very popular in short bursts on Flickr, according to the stats, but I don't know why there is lots of interest, then none.

Friday, 1 April 2011

1st April 2011

Sorry! Welcome to the morning of April 1st 2011. Enjoy the rest of the day!

Saturday, 26 March 2011

Grand Days Out for Grandparents

Grand Days out for Grandparents
The relationship between grandparents and grandchildren can be a very special one and time spent together is something to be savoured.  Perhaps part of the magic of this relationship comes from the generation gap and where better to explore this further than in one of the many museums in Gloucestershire. Here you can share discoveries of how things used to be compared to today, perhaps in your day, or further back in time.  So many things stay the same, such as our need for food, clothes, shelter and even toys, but the design and materials often change dramatically over time.  Many museums make special efforts to encourage family visits from all ages and offer lots of activities, interactive screens and events for their younger visitors which are fun and designed to include the adults too.
A quick browse through www.gloucestershirerevealed.co.uk will show a number of museums which cover a wide variety of subjects keeping youngsters amused with a mixture of activities and play, both indoors and out. So to give an idea of what can be done in Gloucestershire here are some possibilities to consider.
The Museum in the Park, Stroud, has a park for youngsters to play in and around. The museum has temporary exhibitions, talks and drop in activities throughout the year for all ages, so if you’re looking for things to do that you can share with your grandchildren this is a great place to be. The museum focuses on the history of Stroud and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times up to the modern day. Most rooms have areas where children are encouraged to try themed games, such as making mosaics, creating gearing systems, and using interactive screens plus there is a dedicated play area/reading room. Many exhibits are local and you should be able to tell the children about some of the domestic appliances on show and probably some of the toys too. It is amazing how quickly our own childhood memories can appear in a museum.
Outside you can wander down to the lake and work up an appetite for lunch. During the summer it is an ideal spot to stop and have a picnic or packed lunch and talk about what you have seen, while watching the ducks and swans on the water. The museum is open for the majority of the year all week except Mondays (excluding Bank Holidays).  On site are baby changing facilities, a lift plus a large car park shared with the leisure centre. Access for pushchairs is good, with ramps up to the exhibition rooms and a lift. It is suggested you allow two to three hours for your visit.


In the Forest of Dean is the Dean Heritage Centre at Soudley. Located in an historic mill building with lake, it has a mixture of indoor and outdoor exhibits. There is a good sized car park and access for pushchairs is simple, with lifts to take you to upper floors. On entering you at once start a Forest related journey from the Ice Age to the present day - beware the wolf as you enter and other furry creatures watching your progress! As you explore the site with your grandchildren you discover together the Royal Forest’s history, helped with fun activities for the children dotted about, from brass rubbing to dressing up clothes, especially in the recreated old school room.
Outside, there is more to find. The larger exhibits range from machinery to buildings, and will be the subject for discussion on how things used to be compared with our modern way of life. You will encounter a Forester’s Cottage, a Charcoal Burner’s Camp, a Free Mine and to the delight of many, a couple of large Old Spot pigs on your route around the site. A walk around the lake takes you in a loop back to the car park, past the Adventure Playground, with benches for you to sit on while the children play on the equipment.  After, head up to the family friendly cafe where you can enjoy a good lunch with decent sized portions of delicious local food and drink – high chairs are available should you want them. Although a popular spot the atmosphere is very relaxed and you feel very much away from the hustle and bustle of the modern world. The Dean Heritage Centre is open throughout the year except between 24th 28th December and you should allow for a couple of hours there.

Just 20 minutes drive away is the Dean Forest Railway, which operates through most of the year from March onwards. There is nothing like the romance of steam and you can share the excitement sounds and smells of these trains and describe a time when train travel was more glamorous and appealing. Closer to Christmas are Santa Specials, where your grandchildren will meet Father Christmas and his Elves and receive a present too. You can all get very close to the steam engines and discover the Forest landscape in all seasons from a heated carriage or get off together at one of the stops and explore the Forest walks, before returning on a later train.
There is a museum just beyond the gift shop with artefacts and larger exhibits such as a reconstruction of a rural Ticket office which may spark some memories for you. A popular "hands on" exhibit for children is the telephone exchange which in this modern world of smart ‘phones and internet is something your grandchildren will probably not have met before. How often do we get to dial numbers on a traditional ‘phone now? The Museum is open whenever trains are running and doesn’t require a ticket to gain entrance to it. The large car park at Norchard offers access for pushchairs to the shops, trains and museum. Depending on whether you ride the trains or get off them, you can spend between a couple of hours to a full day here indulging in shared nostalgia.

In Tewkesbury the John Moore Countryside Museum focuses on rural Gloucestershire and its wildlife. On entering the 15th Century building there is the immediate opportunity to stroke a fox, mole, otter and hedgehog (although they are examples of taxidermy rather than live inhabitants) with further birds and animals to be discovered over the next two floors. It is very likely that you will be showing your grandchildren animals and birds they will have never seen before. To explore the interesting and cosy museum there are quizzes for children with Moore the Mole providing you with a score at the end. A trip around the museum should take about an hour.
A few doors further down the street is The Merchant’s House another 15th Century building which was a home and shop, now restored to as near original condition as possible. Prepare yourselves for a very different experience from a modern house as there are no recognisable modern day comparisons. At certain times of the year there are guided tours where the history of the building can be further discovered by candle light. The Museum is open most of the year Tuesday to Saturdays plus Bank Holidays. The museum is very welcoming on and the staff will be happy to help you get the most from your visit. 


If you or the children like art then a visit to Nature in Art at Twigworth, north of Gloucester is a great way to spend a morning or afternoon in a Georgian Mansion built in the 1700’s. There are many different types of animals, birds, insects etc featured in pictures and sculptures will provide something different yet fun for all ages and plenty to talk about. In the garden are more sculptures in a variety of materials and the opportunity for much of the year to see an artist at work in their own studios.
The setting is very family friendly and offers specific children’s activities during school holidays. You will also find a very good cafe with friendly service, offering a range of tasty main courses and desserts, or you could just have tea, coffee and a slice of cake. There is plenty of room to bring in pushchairs from the car park outside and Nature in Art provides a warm welcome in all ways throughout the year, except when closed December 24th – 26th and Mondays.

 

In Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswolds, you will find the Cotswolds Motor Museum. Your grandchildren may recognise Brum, the little car that starred in his own TV show, but there are lots of discoveries to make together, with vans, sports cars and even a Formula 1 racing car to see. It will undoubtedly stir memories to be shared and questions to be asked from all the family. There is a specific play area for children and the route around the museum is all level for easy access for pushchairs. The Museum is closed in January and February.

 

Heading further back in time is the Corinium Museum in Cirencester where you will be transported back to the past glory and splendour of Roman Britain. There are lots of things to keep the children amused here from dressing up to interactive information through computer terminals. The museum is a great blend of hi-tech (which most kids instinctively head towards) and traditional, so you should all be able to learn together about the history Cirencester from prehistoric times although the main focus is the Romans, and get a real sense of discovery and fun together. If you’re hungry you can go through to Jacks Cafe which can be accessed from the museum, but as your ticket entitles you to an all day visit you can explore more of Cirencester and return later if you wish. The Museum is open all year, except for 23rd – 26th December and New Year’s Day and has lots of child friendly activities to keep the youngsters amused. There is excellent access for pushchairs throughout the museum with good toilet facilities too, and allow between one to four hours for a visit.

 

In a totally different vein, in Cheltenham is the Holst Birthplace Museum, where you can step off the street and take your grandchildren back in time to a multi period house covering Victorian, Regency and Edwardian periods in different rooms. You will discover that even small houses could appear quite opulent in their reception rooms, but as you climb the stairs past the family bedrooms you’ll get to where the servants slept and the Attic room where the children were expected to stay all day away from the parents! In this room are a number of toys and games from past eras, many still recognisable by children of recent times, so have a play together as you share stories of your childhood. For a complete contrast head to the basement and show the children how it was “below stairs” with the recreated Victorian Kitchen. Here you will discover how hard the servants worked, to do things that we take for granted today like preparing food, cleaning and the laundry.

  

A final suggestion to visit is the Edward Jenner Museum, in Berkeley. Situated in the former home of Dr Edward Jenner who pioneered vaccination, the 300 year old house has a fascinating mix of gruesome pictures of smallpox victims, the chance for you to share the experience of exploring the spooky Attic Rooms where the servants lived (check that tours are running) and outside, the Vinery. Outside, tucked in a corner of the garden is the Grade II* thatched rustic hut that Jenner christened “The Temple of Vaccinia” where he vaccinated the poor for free against smallpox. This has always proved popular with children and is usually one of their lasting memories of a visit to the museum.
Of interest to some children is the photograph on the half landing of the stairs showing what has become known as “The Jenner Ghost”. Taken by the BBC the image of a ghostly figure appears in a doorway in the Attic. If you get a chance to go on an Attic Tour, will you be the only ones up there....?

 

The above is just a small selection of places that grandparents could visit with grandchildren in Gloucestershire and a way of enjoying their company for a half day or full day out. Most admissions are either free or less than £5 for an adult and there are discounts available for over 65s. It has been proven that if children visit museums from an early age they will continue to do so as they grow up and this can only benefit their general education and understanding of history and give you more excuses to spend time together in the future. What better way of learning than sharing happy experiences with an older generation who can share stories from their upbringing?
A bit of learning coupled with a visit to the shop and some cake has got to be a good thing – unless you’ve had strict orders from their parents not to over indulge them!
For more information on the above venues and other Gloucestershire Museums see www.gloucestershirerevealed.co.uk

Monday, 21 March 2011

Energy Performance Certificates for Holiday Lets

As from the 30th June 2011 short term holiday lets will need an Energy Performance Assessment (EPC).  An EPC will be required for a property rented out as a holiday let where the building is occupied as a result of a short term letting arrangement and is rented out for a combined total of 4 months or more in any 12 month period.  Prior to this holiday lets have been exempt from the requirement.  The trigger point for the requirement is at the time when the property is first rented out following the 30th of June, as an EPC can be obtained for holiday lets prior to this date owners would be wise to consider obtaining one as soon as possible.
 
The owner, not the agent will have responsibility for obtaining the EPC.  From July the agent will need to attach the EPC to the written particulars where these are provided.
 
EPC’s are potentially useful to the owners of short term holiday lets as they suggest measures which can reduce the use of energy, and as the cost of heating and lighting of holiday accommodation is in most cases borne directly by the owners, the rising fuel prices can significantly reduce the income from rents. Therefore saving energy can make a significant difference to the viability of the business.
 
For expert advice and help with your holiday lets, contact:
 
Lynn Edwards MA MCIEH MCIH

Domestic Energy Assessor

Tel: 01454 323340 or 07973 166692
 

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Saturday, 26 February 2011

Chrysler 300C 5.7 V8 HEMI


Chrysler 300C 5.7 V8 HEMI
Originally uploaded by CopperPhoenix

My first "Hemi", a fantastic beast to drive (in a straight line, in the dry!) when all eight cylinders fire up (as it normally drives on only four), the engine note changes from a rumble to a growl, to a snarl!

It was one of the highlights of my time working with a client, the occasional automotive treat keeps the marketing consultant happy!

www.copperphoenix.co.uk

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

Go-ahead for Jet Age Museum at Gloucestershire Airport

JET AGE MUSEUM PRESS RELEASE
15 February 2011
 

Just £80,000 is now needed for a museum commemorating an outstanding part of the nation’s aviation history to go ahead.

Gloucestershire charity Jet Age Museum is pressing ahead with building a pemanent home now that planning consent has been granted.

The all-volunteer museum’s collection of historic planes and archives can now be saved for posterity in a purpose-built museum at Gloucestershire Airport.

The airport is providing a two-acre low-rent site and the museum has already raised about £190,000 towards the estimated £270,000 cost of Phase 1. Tewkesbury Borough Council approved the planning application, with conditions, on 11 February.

Construction will now go out to tender and fundraising for the remaining £80,000 is being stepped up. Funds raised to date have come from significant donations by Rolls-Royce plc, a local charitable trust and the museum’s own members. In addition, Tewkesbury Borough Council has pledged to contribute ten per cent of money raised up to a limit of £27,000.

Jet Age Museum chairman John Lewer said: “Thanks to our group of dedicated supporters a permanent home for the museum is at last within our reach. It’s an exciting and worthwhile project - please give your support in any way you can.”
 

FURTHER INFORMATION:
John Lewer can be contacted on 01562 69797 or by email: john.lewer@virginmedia.com
See also Jet Age Museum’s website at www.jetagemuseum.org
 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The jet engine was designed by British engineering genius Sir Frank Whittle (1907–1996). His son Ian is a patron of Jet Age Museum.

Britain’s first jet plane, the Gloster E28/39, powered by Whittle’s revolutionary invention, first left the ground on 8 April 1941 at the Gloster factory-airfield between Gloucester and Cheltenham.

Its official first flight was at RAF Cranwell, Lincolnshire, on 15 May 1941.

The original aeroplane can be seen in London’s Science Museum.

Jet Age Museum volunteers have built a full-size replica which can be seen by appointment at their Brockworth restoration workshop, close to the factory where the original was designed and built.

Three more of the museum’s Gloster-built aircraft are on view: examples of Britain’s first jet fighter, the Meteor, and the Cold War-era Javelin are at Gloucestershire Airport and a fully-detailed reproduction 1925 Gamecock biplane is at Brockworth with the replica of the first jet.

Ongoing restoration projects include rebuilding an RAF Gladiator biplane which crashed in Norway in 1940 and a late World War Two Gloster-built Hawker Typhoon.

Other aircraft, engines and exhibits, together with the museum’s outstanding document and photographic archive, are currently in store awaiting completion of the new building.

Jet Age Museum is an all-volunteer registered charity (number 297818) with more than 200 members. Members meet at the Tithe Barn Centre, Brockworth Court, Court Road, Brockworth GL3 4QU on the second Wednesday of every month at 7.30 pm. Newcomers are always welcome.

END

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Saturday, 12 February 2011

Wet Day Discoveries

Despite the occasional heat wave the British weather is still an unpredictable thing and sometimes our plans for a family day out are going to be disrupted by rain. So we can’t go for the picnic we’d planned or the walks (at least not without getting very wet) so what is the alternative? 

 

Have you looked at local museums recently? The traditional image of a stuffy dusty building is a long way from reality with museums now recognising the appeal of family friendly destinations and offering activities, exhibitions and family tickets aimed squarely at encouraging families to call. So on a wet day what would be the best places to discover in Gloucestershire? Looking at www.gloucestershirerevealed.co.uk for a selection of museums we have come up with a list of venues suitable to explore on a wet day. They are under cover, dry and warm – perfect for a wet day when you want to be inside.

 

The Corinium Museum in Cirencester is in the centre of town close to car parks and shops, here you can find out about the Romans who built and lived in Cirencester. On a wet day you are bound to feel sympathy for the Romans who were used to much warmer and sunnier climes! There are lots of things to keep all the family amused here, with reconstructions of Roman shops and domestic rooms, clothing for children to dress up in and sit with a Roman Legionnaire in his Barracks, plenty of interactive information through computer terminals, and hands on fun such as building mosaics in the Atrium area. If the weather remains wet, you can walk under a covered way from the museum to Jacks Cafe next door and watch the rain on the glass roof.  Your museum ticket entitles you to an all day visit so if the weather did get better you can explore more of Cirencester and return to the museum later if you wish.

 

 

 

 

Still in the dry after your visit you should browse the shop which sells a good mixture of items for children including armour and helmets, books, jewellery and ornaments, indeed something for everyone. Just beyond is an exhibition space which has a changing series of displays that tie into the events that run through the year. Many events are indoors and aimed at family activities so check the website for more details before your wet day visit. The Museum is open all year, except for Christmas and New Year and has lots of child friendly activities to keep the youngsters amused. There is excellent access for pushchairs throughout the museum with good toilet facilities too and despite the weather you will want to spend between one to four hours for a visit.

 

If you are caught in bad weather in the Forest of Dean, then the Dean Heritage Centre at Soudley will offer you both shelter and food in an historic mill building next to a lake. Although the Centre has outdoor exhibits, if it is too wet to look at them then as a family you can still explore the inside in the dry – you may feel brave enough to venture out afterwards!  From the good sized car park access for pushchairs is simple, with lifts to take you to upper floors. On entering the Heritage Centre you will start a Forest related journey from the Ice Age to the present day - beware the wolf as you enter and other furry creatures watching your progress! Exploring the galleries reveals the Royal Forest’s history, and you will unearth throughout the galleries activities for children, from brass rubbing to dressing up clothes in the recreated old school room. 

 

 

If the rain is still putting you off exploring the woods head up to the first floor and the family friendly cafe. Here you can enjoy a good lunch together, children meals are an option and high chairs are available too - if sitting by a window you can look out over the lake with the ducks and other water birds who probably won’t be as worried about wet weather as we may be!

 

The site’s atmosphere is rustic and feels remote from the hustle and bustle of the modern world. It is open throughout the year except between 24th 26th December and you should allow an hour for the exhibits inside.

 

If you’re caught in wet weather near Bourton-on-the-Water you could visit the Cotswolds Motor Museum. Your children may recognise Brum, the little car that starred in his own TV show, but there are lots of discoveries to make together, with delivery vans, sports cars and even a Formula 1 racing car to see. It will stir memories to be shared and questions to be asked from all the family. As well as the cars there are plenty of motoring items and toys dotted throughout the museum with one area devoted to displaying the vintage Toy collection. There is an indoor play area for children but there is so much to see and find out on your visit that youngsters should be kept well occupied throughout the museum. Afterwards there are plenty of motoring related items to buy in the shop ranging from die cast models to pocket money purchases. The route around the museum is all on the level for easy access for pushchairs. Sometimes in moving between buildings you may have to brave the elements but it is only very briefly that you’ll be exposed to the rain. 

 

 

 

It is open all year except for January and February and allow an hour to visit, hopefully enough for the wet weather to pass. There are currently no refreshment facilities on site but a very quick dash around the corner will take you to a tea room that offers food and cakes.

 

If you or your family have an interest in art then a visit to Nature in Art at Twigworth, north of Gloucester is a great way to spend a wet morning or afternoon. In a Georgian Mansion built in the 1700’s the many different types of animals, birds, insects etc that are featured in pictures and sculptures throughout the house should provide something diverting, dry and warm for a family visit. Although there are sculptures outside the majority are within the main building so unaffected by the weather. The whole setting is family friendly and offers specific children’s activities during school holidays too, while the shop is full of artist’s materials, art books plus pocket money purchases and would be a good source of presents for those who enjoy the arts. You will also find a very good cafe with friendly service, offering a range of tasty main courses and desserts, or just tea, coffee and a slice of cake while watching the rain from the conservatory. There’s plenty of room to bring in pushchairs from the car park outside and Nature in Art provides a warm welcome in all ways throughout the year. It only closes between December 24th – 26th and on Mondays.

 

 

The Museum in the Park, Stroud, is set a little way from the car park, about three minutes brisk walk, but once inside there is plenty to discover on a wet day. The museum plays host to temporary exhibitions, talks and drop in activities throughout the year for all ages, typically workshops making things so that you have something you can all take home with you at the end.

 

Even if there are no activities then you’ll have fun exploring the museum together. It focuses on the history of Stroud and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times up to the modern day. Most rooms have areas where children are encouraged to try themed games, such as making mosaics, creating gearing systems, and using interactive screens plus there is a dedicated play area/reading room. The children may enjoy the skulls on display, dresses and a wall display of weapons, but the museum has in its collection the very first lawnmower and there are some smaller sized ones for the youngsters to try mowing the carpet! There are baby changing facilities, a lift and access for pushchairs is good, with ramps up to the exhibition rooms. It is suggested you allow two to three hours for your visit.

 

If the wet weather lessens there is the parkland to explore, with tarmac paths to keep you off the grass and mud. A walk down to the bridge across the bottom of the lake, around the water and up takes about twenty minutes and the water birds and swans can provide plenty of distraction. Although there are no specific refreshment facilities at the museum, there are some in the sports centre next door and in Stroud itself.

 

 

In Tewkesbury on Church Street the John Moore Countryside Museum offers an interesting refuge from the rain. It focuses on rural Gloucestershire and its wildlife in a 15th Century building. On entering there is the immediate opportunity to stroke a fox, mole, otter and hedgehog (although they are examples of taxidermy rather than live inhabitants) with further birds and animals to be discovered over the next two floors in glass cases. As you move up the steep stairs examples of farming implements sit alongside the wildlife that was so prevalent in pre mechanised days and is very difficult to spot today. You may be showing your children some animals and birds they will have never seen before. To help families on wet days explore there are quizzes for children to take around the museum, with Moore the Mole providing you with a score at the end. A trip around the museum should be about an hour.

 

A few doors further down the street is The Merchant’s House another 15th Century building which was a home and shop, now restored to as near original condition as possible. Prepare yourselves for a very different experience from a modern house as there are no recognisable modern day comparisons. Seeing this on a wet day will bring home the lack of light in the building, and how primitive living conditions were, even for a merchant who would have been relatively well off! As a family would you have been happy to all sleep in the same room, or crouch around an open hearth to cook?

At certain times of the year you may find themed events focusing on the history of the building over different periods. Any inclement weather will really add to the atmosphere of such a visit. The Museum has limited opening during the winter but otherwise is open most of the week through the year. Because the buildings are so old there are steep stairs and steps up into them, so access for pushchairs is compromised but not impossible. The museum is very cosy and welcoming on a wet day and the staff will be happy to help you get the most from your visit.  

 

Another good indoor visit is to be had at the Edward Jenner Museum, in Berkeley. Situated in the former home of Dr Edward Jenner who pioneered vaccination, the 300 year old house has a fascinating mix of gruesome pictures of smallpox victims, the chance for you to share the experience of exploring the spooky 300 year old Attic Rooms where the servants lived (check that tours are running) and a recreation of Jenner’s study. The doctor’s medical instruments, for flensing and amputating always get a reaction from people of all ages! As smallpox is a disease that now no longer exists, this museum is a source of fascination for both adults and children alike as they learn of “the speckled monster”.

 

 

Of interest to some will be the photograph on the half landing of the stairs showing what has become known as “The Jenner Ghost”. Taken by the BBC the image of a ghostly figure appears in a doorway in the Attic. If you get a chance to go on an Attic Tour, will you be the only ones up there? The Attic is a perfect visit for a gloomy wet day, as the weather will enhance the atmosphere. With the rain against the windows you’ll get a feel as to the conditions the servants had to endure, despite living in a supposedly comfortable house.

 

There are children’s trails to follow in the museum, a “den” area and events aimed at families to join in with. If you are going to visit regularly, the Museum has introduced a Friends Scheme which gives free entry as one of the benefits.

 

Outside, if you want to brave the rain, tucked in a corner of the garden is the Grade II* quaint thatched rustic hut that Jenner christened “The Temple of Vaccinia” where he vaccinated the poor for free against smallpox. This has always proved popular with children and is usually one of their lasting memories of a visit to the museum. 

 

Finally a wet weather option in Cheltenham is the Holst Birthplace Museum. You can step off the street and take your family back in time to a Victorian, Regency and Edwardian furnished house, different periods being represented in different rooms. As you move through the house you will discover that even small houses could appear quite opulent in their reception rooms, but as you all climb the stairs past the family bedrooms you’ll get to where the servants slept and the Attic room where the children were expected to stay all day away from the parents! In this room are a number of toys and games from past eras, many still recognisable by children of recent times, so have a play together out of the rain. For a complete contrast head to the basement and show the children how it was “below stairs” with the recreated Victorian Kitchen, if you’re lucky there will be a fire burning in the grate. Here discover how hard the servants worked, to do things that we take for granted today like preparing food, cleaning and the laundry. There is a pay and display car park signposted near the museum and is a couple of minutes walk away. It does have lots of stairs to climb and little room for pushchairs. There are some cafes nearby if you want any food or drink, but it is in a mainly residential area.

 

So there we have it. Even if it is wet and dreary you can still get out as a family and discover something different in Gloucestershire. All the museums can be enjoyed on a wet day and in some cases if the rain does stop there will be some outdoor discoveries to be made too, and you can always decide to come back on a drier day to explore further.

 

Most admissions are either free or less than £5 for an adult and there are discounts available for over 65s. So why not have a few wet day trips up your sleeve if your original day’s plans have to alter? But whatever the weather all of Gloucestershire’s museums will give you a warm welcome and a good value family day out.

 

For more information on specific opening times and to see what other museums you can visit in Gloucestershire visit www.gloucestershirerevealed.co.uk  

 

Words - Tim Davies, Copper Phoenix

Pictures - Rupert Marlow, Rupert Marlow Photography

 

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